Senior Cyber: An Interview With The Author (And A Chance To Win A Copy Of The Book)

Cybersecurity At Every Age

Last week, PC Matic VP of Sales, Corey Munson, sat down with Scott N. Schober. Scott’s book, Senior Cyber: Best Security Practices for Your Golden Years covers topics, “From the basics of the internet to the fight for healthcare privacy and security that is so critical to our aging population, Senior Cyber offers simple advice and expertise for all levels of internet experience.”

Scott covers both basic and advanced tech and security topics with the aim to make them accessible to everyone. One point they discussed, and one that deserves a bit of attention, is the inaccessibility in registration for the COVID-19 vaccine.

Scott discussing a COVID scam

The first round is available to people 65+ who are wanting to get vaccinated. One of the problems with the rollout, is that many adults in the eligible category aren’t as tech savvy as the registration may require. The potential for scams, as Scott describes above, is high.

There’s also the potential that people who need or want the vaccine will be skipped, simply because the signup process isn’t catered to them. In a LinkedIn post, Corey describes his own experience with signing up a family member. Additionally, he calls on others to assist eligible people they may know in getting registered.

Understanding Someone Else’s Point-Of-View

Scott and Corey discussed looking at cybersecurity through the lens of someone over 65.

Based on the comments we receive here on the Tech Talk blog, a lot of you consider yourselves not to be as tech savvy as you’d like. For Scott, that doesn’t mean you aren’t knowledgeable or able. What it means is that you approach technology differently than people in another generation.

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Scott discussing differing vantage points on technology

So he’s looking to bring his cybersecurity approach to you in a way that works with your particular viewpoint.

A quick internet search of “ransomware attacks” will show a multitude of stories from just the past week. Phishing and phone scams coupled with fraudulent text and email links are increasing as well. It’s important to be able to know how to spot the warning signs for these scams. Scott wants to make sure you can do that.

Moreover, the book is a guide. We’re in a constant state of searching for information that will help our understanding of the world. Senior Cyber aims to open up your understanding of topics relevant to you and your relationship with cybersecurity.

Win A Copy

Scott was generous enough to gift us with 5 copies of Senior Cyber: Best Security Practices for Your Golden Years to give away. For a chance at the random drawing that will be held on Monday, February 22nd, hop over to this quick and secure survey.

How much do you know about cybersecurity and current events surrounding it? What’s your greatest security challenge? We want to hear from you both in our secure survey above and in the comments below. It’s our responsibility to each other to practice online safety and keep each other informed. We want you to stay safe out there.

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2 thoughts on “Senior Cyber: An Interview With The Author (And A Chance To Win A Copy Of The Book)

  1. Thank you. I have a blitz of advertising wanting me to switch security chances. I even had a repairman say that I needed to switch to something more compatible with most programs. I told them not a chance. Your products and service are the absolute best I have ever used. Thank you. I also love Morgan’s ad too. She reminds me of my granddaughter.

  2. most seniors and the general population not knowing what phishing is will open an e-mail thinking it is from someone they know. opening an attachment they were not expecting and the reply message is different is one give away that opens the door. Many Scammers are using things like your order is on the way with link to check on it. Then there are those that receive a flash on the monitor that their computer has be infected and to call this number ****, then allow the scammers remote access to their computer and demanding money to correct the problem. It would be helpful if most ISP’s gave out a card with the “how to avoid and what to watch out for when opening their e-mail or surfacing the internet.

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